ART NOW

Exploring the theme of experience in Art with a focus in interactive installations.

odditiesoflife:

The Happy Show

Are you happy? This interdisciplinary, interactive art installation just might have your answer, or at least get you thinking about it. Currently touring several cities in the United States, The Happy Show by graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister, combines a unique mix of art installations with graphic design and thought-provoking typographical displays of data. The show also “offers visitors the experience of walking into Stefan Sagmeister’s mind as he attempts to increase his happiness via mediation, cognitive therapy, and mood-altering pharmaceuticals.”

The large exhibition is filled with social data and research gathered from Harvard psychologists Daniel Gilbert and Steven Pinker, anthropologist Donald Symons, psychologist Jonathan Haidt, as well as several prominent historians. The installation’s interdisciplinary approach reveals great insight into our society’s state of mind about love, happiness and personal levels of satisfaction. The Happy Show is currently on view at the Chicago Cultural Center through September 23rd, 2013. The above images are courtesy of Stefan Sagmeister.

sources 1, 2

prostheticknowledge:

Angles Mirror by Daniel Rozin

Interactive installation using a triangular method of representation with a motorized array:

The “Angles Mirror” rejects the idea of building a picture based on relative lightness and darkness. Instead, it explores a system of linear rotation that indicates the direction of an object’s contour. A wall-mounted sculpture, the “Angles Mirror” is a sharp triangular block of steel, dotted with yellow indicator arms that pivot. Based on the isometric grid, its structure favors the patterns and angles found in an equilateral triangle. The arms, which do not have the ability to change brightness or luminosity, use input from a camera and reconstruct the view with areas of varying angles. The negative space surrounding a viewer is translated into horizontal lines on the picture plane. Rather than creating a photorealistic image, the three-dimensional movement of a figure is represented, visualizing optical flow as viewer’s proximity to the sculpture changes. A nuanced contour results, as the viewer shifts back and forth, altering how the structure of space is perceived. Similar to “Fan Mirror”, in the “Angles Mirror”, the sequence of movement across the picture plane is directed in part by its audience. When the viewer walks away from the work, or chooses to view the sculpture from a distance, a series of predefined images and transitions cover the object’s surface.

There are more examples of Daniel’s interactive and alternative ‘mirrors’ at the Bitform Gallery’s Vimeo page here

razorshapes:

White” by Studio 400

A team of twenty students from a fifth-year architectural design studio at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (cal poly), developed the large-scale, interactive sculpture to showcase each student’s research book. The piece integrates both the introduction of the students’ investigative publications and their collective installation by creating a previously unseen environment. “White” is an actualised representation of the relationship between environment, user, material and space. The 4,500 square foot space has been transformed by a climbable sculpture constructed from 80,000 square feet of plastic sheeting arranged in cylindrical and tapered weaves. The material was first sliced, then loomed, woven, stapled, taped and tied by the collective in order to create a supportive surface in which gallery goers could rest and examine their architectural studies. 

(via artinstallation)

Bea Camacho, Enclose. 2005

Single-channel video 

11 hours

These pictures are from a video documentation  which deals with ideas of isolation, security, shelter and of shaping one’s own environment. The video documents an eleven-hour performance during which Camacho crocheted herself into a cocoon using red yarn. She crocheted continuously without breaks and the video shows the entire performance in real-time.

Bea Camacho, Efface 2008

Single-channel video11 hours2008

These pics are from a video documentation of an eleven-hour performance during which Bea Camach crocheted herself into a white carpet with white yarn. This project builds on the themes explored in an earlier video performance, “Enclose”, but puts more emphasis on the space around the body, which becomes an integral part of the work as her body slowly disappears into the architecture.

Bea Camacho, Efface 2008

Single-channel video
11 hours
2008

These pics are from a video documentation of an eleven-hour performance during which Bea Camach crocheted herself into a white carpet with white yarn. This project builds on the themes explored in an earlier video performance, “Enclose”, but puts more emphasis on the space around the body, which becomes an integral part of the work as her body slowly disappears into the architecture.

iheartmyart:

Jeppe Hein, Smoking Bench, 2002
Exhibition There Are No Ordinary Moments at the Amos Anderson Art Museum, August 11 - January 13, 2014

iheartmyart:

Jeppe Hein, Smoking Bench, 2002

Exhibition There Are No Ordinary Moments at the Amos Anderson Art Museum, August 11 - January 13, 2014

7 months ago

This spring UCCA inaugurates a site-specific exhibition, a result of the unique collaboration between renowned Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson and the talented young Chinese architect Ma Yansong. This installation is the manifesto of a creative dialogue developed between the two, an interaction pushing the line between art and architecture to new limits. The final result is a breathtaking piece specifically designed for UCCA’s space. It takes the spectator on an extraordinary journey, challenging the status of one’s relationship both with nature and one’s urban surroundings.